Back to Health Tips 



"Not everything that is faced can be changed;
but nothing can be changed until it
is faced." 

~ James Baldwin ~


"If nothing ever
changed;
there would
be no
butterflies." 


           

The selected Health Tip is summarized below.  An audio clip of the tip as presented by Dr. Leah on the Chat With Women radio show is available at the end of the tip.


Myths & Truths - many beliefs about health are unfounded

Have you ever heard...�Don�t go outside in the cold with your hair wet.  You�ll get sick.� 

Or... �Don�t swim after you eat or you�ll get stomach cramps."

Where do these sayings come from and are they really true?

First of all, going outside when it�s cold with wet hair or without a jacket will not make you sick.  Being cold does not make you sick.  The change from a warm environment to a cold environment can make your nose run...or from cold to warm for that matter. But that doesn�t mean you will get sick.

In 'natural medicine' we often use temperature changes to stimulate the immune system.
Some people jump into cold lakes or oceans in the winter time and this activity has led to fewer colds and flus in the people who made the plunge.  Also, ending your hot shower with cold water has shown to stimulate the immune system.  So it�s not all that bad to get a little cold sometimes...it�s actually good for you!

What about exercising after you eat?  Well...this is somewhat true.

Ideally you should wait a little while after you have a big meal to do strenuous exercise. When you are digesting food your body shunts a lot of blood to the digestive system (stomach and intestines).  If you exercise real hard, your body wants to move that blood from the digestive system to your muscles and that doesn�t go over well with your stomach. You will get indigestion and possibly stomach cramps.  If you are lightly exercising, like stretching or walking, then you probably won�t have a problem after you eat.

What other health myths can you think of that might or might not be true?

 
 

play audio                        download MP3
* Health Tips audio recordings average 4 to 5 minutes in length.
* Depending upon your connection speed, there may be a delay before the audio begins to play.

 
 

  Back to Health Tips  

� 2007-2009 McNeill Naturopathic Clinic, LLC - All rights reserved